STATEMENT BY MAYOR ERIC E. JACKSON ON THE CITY’S PROPERTY REVALUATION

Statement by Mayor Eric E. Jackson on the City’s Property Revaluation

WASHINGTON, D.C. – (RealEstateRama) — In 2010, the Mercer County Board of Taxation ordered Trenton municipal government to conduct a citywide revaluation of more than 30,000 residential and commercial properties in the city. The last revaluation was in 1992. We selected New Jersey-based Appraisal Systems, which has done this work in numerous other municipalities in the state, to undertake the comprehensive analysis. Appraisal Systems was very communicative with taxpayers leading up to and during the revaluation, urging community members to connect to them if they had questions or concerns. Although the company completed its assessment and issued preliminary assessment notices in January 2017, much work remains, and we appreciate that this is an ongoing process of education and additional communication.

My administration is committed to ensuring tax fairness for all Trentonians. We have stabilized property tax increases and controlled the cost of government. While the recent property revaluation was mandated, we are equally committed to working toward solutions for those residents who may now be faced with difficult tax challenges. City Hall’s doors are open to all residents who have questions and ideas. My administration is taking this very seriously. We are assembling a tax taskforce comprised of City staff and statewide experts to address the impacts of the revaluation to help Trenton residents and businesses continue to grow.

Several community forums will be held in the weeks ahead to hear from residents and business owners.

Please direct all media inquiries to:

Michael A. Walker
Public Information Officer and Aide to the Mayor
City of Trenton
Office of the Mayor
City Hall
319 East State Street
Trenton, NJ 08608

Direct: 609-989-3033
Cell Phone: 609-789-7272
E-mail: mwalker (at) trentonnj (dot) org

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